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Two Trees Forestry
167 Main St.
P.O. Box 356
Winthrop, ME 04364
V: (207) 377-7196
F: (207) 377-7198 harold@twotreesforestry.com

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Friday, February 21 2014

2013 - A strong year, despite the weather extremes

This past year, Two Trees covered more territory, earned more stumpage dollars for clients, shifted gears more often due to weather ... and grew by one employee. It was a very eventful year.

Today it is pouring and Main Street and many skid trails across central Maine streams are flooded. The last few weeks have been decidedly cold, which kept the pre-Christmas ice in the trees and woods for at least these past weeks. This fall was thankfully quite dry after a very wet summer. To say that we've had to work with the weather would be a considerable understatement. But life goes on and those who work in the woods seem to have persevered, if not happily! Yet as we head into the new year I look back on a surprisingly strong 2013; we cut more wood and generated more stumpage dollars than any previous year. I suppose a small and somewhat older consulting business is a bit recession proof, given that we generate income for landowners and repeat-business cycles steadily back to us at 10 to 20-year intervals.

This year we scrambled however and traveled widely across the state, extending east to Lincoln, north and west to Rangeley and the New Hampshire border, south to Sanford, and most points in between. We were also fortunate to bring on Wayne Millen, from West Paris, to give ourselves a more consistent presence in Oxford County, where we have been doing more and more business of late. Wayne, former lead forester on the White Mountain National Forest, retired in early 2013, but wanted to keep his hand in forestry. As some of you already know, he has a nice way with people, is quietly confident and capable, and brings larger-landowner experience to Two Trees. The latter feature has been particularly helpful as we ventured forth with larger and larger projects.

2013 was also the time for a quiet celebration as I passed my 25th year with Two Trees and as a noteworthy gift, got to work again with my former partner Mark Miller on a timber sale in China, Maine. We bridged that time quickly and pleasantly.

So, on to 2014. In this edition of Two Trees Features we focus on items relating to bidding timber, wood markets, and the growing concern with invasive insects. Read and enjoy.